Skip to main content

About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
with asean, singapore, japan and korea. and we're also in dialogue with the eu. we have been talking about a bilateral investment treaty, but not necessarily with a due sense of urgency. for meeting since negotiations started in 2007 does not suggest a great deal of haste. much as it might surprise, we want this as much as you did because it is also of interest to us. ladies and gentlemen, important as they are, market access issues, and goods and services, and i to be seen perspective for they can be made to define narrative. why we must work to sort out these challenges, it is not in our interest to let such issues define the relationship. this is why we have proposed to create an ad hoc clearinghouse mechanism to discuss market access issues in the trade policy forum. i believe that we also need to find a new positive narrative that can bind our countries closer together. one such opportunity i feel is in the energy sector. without a shirt access to energy inputs in sufficient quantities, we will not be able to sustain our economic development. therefore, an enduring in the u.s. partner
to employ unconventional tools to further eu's monetary policy, even though the efficacy of these tools was uncertain and it was recognized that their use might carry some potential cost. the better known of these tools is the purchase of large amounts of longer-term government security, what is commonly referred to as quantitative easing. the other in conventional tool is not as forward guidance, providing information about the future path of short-term interest rates anticipated by the committee. both of these approaches are intended to address a gap caused by the effective lower bound. this gap is the shortfall between what the fomc likely would do in current economic circumstances, were it able to reduce the federal funds rate below zero the reality that the rate can't be cut further. i believe the federal reserve's asset purchases and other unconventional policy actions have helped, and are continuing to help fill this gap and to sure up -- short of aggregate demand the evidence just the fomc's actions to lower short and longer term borrowed rates and boost asset prices. howeverpri
of the other things i did want to touch about, and these drug shortages, 50eu6 got to tell you, this affidavit just came from tucson and from the northeast, so it's not specific just to rural or urban areas. these are critical shortages that have to be addressed, and i don't like that -- i don't think that the hypothesis or the conclusions you come to are real. i think we're actually worse shortages. just because we put out a report doesn't mean that we've remedied it. we've actually made some of the problems even worse for the gray market. now we understand where we hoard, where we take, where we increase the sales. so we've got a huge problem here. to go back to my colleague, mr. chaffetz, in federal properties. i want to give you a real clear example of federal properties that have a problem. we just got back from a codell in regards to the state department looking at our embassies, and in particular i want to highlight morocco. here we are spending over $150 million building a new embassy in morocco, and we have yet to assay and look at what the value and possibility of sale of our current
in what our total costs are for the two different 250eu7stypes of employees. so when we talk about a sequester of taking $85 billion i've just given you over $85 billion over ten years and just by looking at a few programs. so when we hear the number and we think about the federal government being twice the size it was 11 years ago and that we're 2% higher in -- 27% fire terms of discretionary than even if sequester goes through as it actually still year. so it's important that wecan people about where we are on these projects. let me gorks for a second, talk about -- we put outlled the waste book. we put it out every year. we gave 100 examples of how tax dollars were wasted last year. $450,000 for on used aret in my state. $325,000 for robot squirrels. this is a grant that was issued to study what we already know about robotic squirrels and their inches interactions with rattlesnakes. i can't see that that's a priority for us when we're running deficits that we need to be spending money on that type of research. we spend $91 million a year giving a -- you won't believe this -- cha
overwhelmed either by europe writ large, the eu or china somehow swallowing up every bit of innovation that exist in the world. they are no longer i think worried about our economy being overwhelmed beyond our shores. but, and i don't think there is no, very little doubt in any circles out there about america's ability to be in position to lead the world in the 21st century. not only in terms of our foreign policy, our incredible defense establishment, but economically. i think the american people are ready to get up as a civil rights leader when i was coming up as a kid said, the american people are just tired of being tired. get up and move. you guys know that because it's happening in your state. you're probably feeling it in your fingertips more than most of us do here in washington. and as i said i think they know we're better positioned than any of the nation in the world to lead the world. and that's what i think they are so frustrated by what they see and don't see happening here in washington. and i think their frustration is turning into a little bit of anger. i found an inte
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5